Syrian refugees wave Turkish and Syrian Independence flags during a protest against Syria's President Bashar al-Assad at Yayladagi refugee camp in Hatay province near the Turkish-Syrian border April 20, 2012. (Photo courtesy of Freedom House 2 on Flickr under CC license)
Syrian refugees wave Turkish and Syrian Independence flags during a protest against Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad at Yayladagi refugee camp in Hatay province near the Turkish-Syrian border April 20, 2012. (Photo courtesy of Freedom House 2 on Flickr under CC license)

By MICHAEL PALAZZOLO, Guest Writer

Unrest continues to grow in the Middle East, as Syria’s conflict with Turkey has shown no signs of stopping.

On Wednesday October 3, Turkish forces fired at Syrian targets in response to the Syrian shelling of a Turkish border town. The shelling killed five local residents and wounded dozens of others, according to CBS news.

A statement from the Turkish Prime-Minister’s office justifies the reasoning behind the Turkish attack.

“Our armed forces at the border region responded to this atrocious attack with artillery fire on points in Syria that were detected with radar, in line with the rules of engagement.”

This all comes on the heels of the current Syrian civil war. Turkey’s involvement stems from that fact that thousands of Syrian refugees flee across the border every day. Turkey also backs Syrian rebel forces fighting against the Syrian army, and Syrian president Bashar Assad.

Junior Christina Matouk is one of the many University of Michigan-Dearborn students of Syrian descent, and part of a large number of Syrians in southeastern Michigan.

“It’s sad to see a country that is part of your heritage tear itself apart like that. My family doesn’t have any close relatives left over there, but I know a lot of Syrians in the community do. All we can do is hope for the best and pray that a solution comes sooner rather than later.”

President Obama noted that United States intervention is unlikely to come, unless the use of chemical warfare becomes a battle tactic.

The Syrian civil war began in March 2011, with the Syrian people calling for the end of president Bashar Assad’s reign. Syrians were relatively peaceful until that point, while the rest of the Middle East was in the midst of what is now known as the “Arab Spring”.

President Assad has noted that the country is on hold and is in the midst of a “real war”. The Free Syrian rebels will continue to fight until president Assad is ousted from his position.