GOP looks to cut funding to all three U of M campuses, Wayne State after Right to Work

Photo courtesy of The Detroit News

By JASON SINGER, Staff Writer

Will U of M Students Suffer Because of Petty Politics?

Simple answer: Most likely.

What do Wayne State and the University of Michigan have in common?

If your first thought was a natural rivalry than you’d be correct. But looks like the coming months will bind these two competitors into a partnership to fight for their funding; a battle worth tens of millions of dollars.

The current circumstances are due to Republican legislators looking to punish the two universities for trying to circumvent the anti-union laws that would prevent laborers from being forced to pay dues for unions to fight on their behalf.

Reports estimate that roughly $27.5 million would be cut from Wayne State if the bill passes and $47.3 million would be cut from all three of UM campuses. Though the bill that is circulating through the echelons of Michigan politics looks to raise state funding by 2.2%, it also says that funding would be reduced to universities that renew union contracts.

And what does this mean for UM Students?

As Rep. Al Pscholka (R) states: This will be “a slap in the face” to Michigan Students. UM students are already struggling with rising tuition, and a reduction in funding most likely means that next year a larger increase will take place leaving many wondering how they’ll cope with the higher expenses.

Neither university broke any laws by not supporting the Right to Work Bill; however, they now find themselves caught up in tit for tat politics. If the cuts are passed where will that $74.8 million go? Bets keep an eye on Kwame Kilpatrick’s bank statements in the coming months.

Now both Wayne State and the University of Michigan are getting a nasty taste of what their students have been experiencing the last few years, but fortunately for the universities they can just shove the cost onto the shoulders of others. Unfortunately that leaves students of both institutions looking at only themselves as the recipients of such burdens.